Resident Stories

We are blessed to be caring for and supporting the greatest generation of American pioneers and heroes. Please enjoy the resident stories we have below and then reach out to us to schedule a personal tour of our award-winning community.

Anne Cuomo - Not the Average Desk Job

There are three things Anne Cuomo can tell you about her life working for the federal government in the Department of Defense.

 

  1. She worked for the National Security Agency (NSA)
  2. She worked in the management of computer science.
  3. If she told you anymore information, she’d probably have to shoot you.

 

How’s that for an ice-breaker?

Such is the talk with the frank and funny Anne Cuomo, born in Salisbury, Maryland, she travelled the world with her career only to eventually find her way home, just in time for a retirement community to open up.

But first things first.

Upon going to work for the NSA, Cuomo began working inside Washington D.C. while living just outside the nation’s capital.

While her position sounded a bit like a desk job, it was anything but, as she got to travel a healthy amount, citing England and Panama as her favorite places, the latter because of a unique geographical fact.

“Panama is the only place on earth where you can see the sun come up over the Pacific,” she says. “There’s a kink in the way the country is laid out where you can see it.”

The Department of Defense job didn’t just bring Cuomo travel stories and a worthwhile career, but also true love.

“I met my husband on the job and we ended up getting married and had a very happy marriage,” she says. He developed cancer and passed away, but we were married for 18 years.”

When she retired in 1997, she moved around a bunch before heading home to Salisbury in 1998. But as she continued to age a bit, more and more health problems emerged, leading her to make a decision for her future.            

“I was running into some health problems.I was having difficulty walking and it got to the point where I knew where I should not drive. I had a disability in my right leg,” she says.

She began to feel like she was encroaching on her friends, asking them to take her everywhere. She didn’t like that feeling.

“I figured in assisted living, I’d get everything I need: medical considerations, food, a comfortable warm place to live,” she says. “Lakeside, with its ability to take care of me, especially to drive me, was the perfect answer.”

Now Cuomo can go out to dinner with friends instead of having to lean on them to take her to get medicine or to the doctor.

“It’s a wonderful thing,” she shares. “Yesterday, I went to a luncheon and there was an all-call for arts and crafts. About 50 of us went to a local restaurant and had fun talking and making things.”

Amazingly her new home at Lakeside at Mallard landing is just three blocks from the home she lived in upon retiring back to Maryland.

 

 

Even as her health slips a little, Cuomo keeps her mind razor sharp. “I play a game called party bridge and I like word games, we have a lot of those,” she says. “I like the movies we show at night. Some of them have a little dust on them, but we get select them by a little committee.

 

It’s a wonderful thing, yesterday I went to a luncheon and there was an all call announcement email for arts and crafts, 50 of us to a local restaurant. It is particular they have a party bridge, and that’s what I like to do; i like word games, do little games call in a word where you look at a word or a phrase and you psoe by extracting letters from it. I like the movies we show at night, four nights a week, some of them have a little dust on them, John Wayne movies, selected by a little committee.

 

Robert "Bob" Hetzler - Growing Stronger Roots

During his working days, Bob Hetzler was a soil scientist. He worked with farmers, examining soils, identifying and mapping out their locations, and ultimately properly utilize them for consumption via plantation.Hetzler was a soil scientist. He worked with farmers, examining soils, identifying and mapping out their locations, and ultimately properly utilize them for consumption via plantation.

He performed this task in the states of Minnesota and North Dakota, two states known for their unforgiving weather and often brutal terrain, which means poor decisions could ruin entire crops for years.

As anyone who has ever worked the soil knows, it takes a long time to put down roots. Nine months isn’t much in the span of a life that has already spanned nine decades, but it’s been enough time for Hetzler to realize he made the right choice by moving to Lakeside at Mallard Landing.Hetzler to realize he made the right choice by moving to Lakeside at Mallard Landing.

“Things are going pretty well here,” the 91-year-old from Minnesota says. “I have no plans or intentions of ever leaving; I’m satisfied with being here.”
Satzler has a son living in Salisbury, Maryland, the town that Lakeside at Mallard Landing calls home. Making the decision to move closer to family wasn’t an easy thing for him.

“I had been living in Minnesota for something close to 50 years,” he said. “I had very good friends and lived in a good neighborhood. It was difficult to give up, but it was the best thing to do to be close to family.”

And even close to 1,400 miles from home, Satzler found that he wasn’t alone.

“One of the first days after I came here, I met a woman from Minnesota,” he says. “We had lived in the same town for a long time, so it was like old neighbors. I’ve also met a man from North Dakota. I didn’t know him before I moved, but he’s very easy to get along with and he has a lot anecdotes and stories to tell.”

New friends help him ease the pain of losing his wife, who he was married to for almost 50 years. In addition to the son in Salisbury, he has another son in the suburbs of Baltimore.

And while Minnesota will always be home, he’s found at least one distinct advantage in his new residence.

“I like this mid-Atlantic climate,” Hetzler declares. “I don’t miss the winters up there at all. I tell everyone here it’s like we’re living on a weather island; all the storms go either north or south of us.”Hetzler declares. “I don’t miss the winters up there at all. I tell everyone here it’s like we’re living on a weather island; all the storms go either north or south of us.”

And as a for staying busy, Hetzler has found himself surrounded with activities and opportunities at every turn.Hetzler has found himself surrounded with activities and opportunities at every turn.

“We have bingo three times a week which is always a big deal, and we have exercise class three times a week,” he says. “What I really like is that they give us a schedule of activities for every day, but also a monthly schedule so we can plan ahead.”

Staying busy is a great way to move, feel, and speak like you’re still a spring chicken, or perhaps a spring mallard in this case. Hetzler says the staff on hand is another big plus for staying healthy and young at heart.Hetzler says the staff on hand is another big plus for staying healthy and young at heart.

“I just turned 91 last August, but we have people here who are much older - a man who is 99 and a woman who is 104,” he says. “The staff is incredible, they check on us frequently and they take very good care of our health.”

 

 

Kathy Green - The Love of Sailing

It was something out a movie, the way Kathy Green met her husband.

She was racing a sailboat with a girlfriend from Long Island. They had a little trouble and a young man appeared to help them out. She would marry that man, and the two of them would turn sailing into a passion.

“We always had a sailboat,” Green, now a resident of Lakeside at Mallard Landing in Salisbury, Maryland, recalls. “We always had a sailboat until we couldn’t sale anymore. We had a whole series of boats. When we moved to Maryland, we would sail up and down the Chesapeake, and we even sailed to Florida once, around the tip and up the west coast to Sarasota.”

The memories of their time on the water are powerful ones for Green, even at age 89. She said she’s found over time that making those type memories are absolutely essential for happiness later in life.

“We had a really good number of years together,” she says of her late husband. “We had a good life and a good marriage; he passed away four years ago. But if I could say one thing to couples today, it’s to do things together. It makes for good memories and when you’re really old, those memories are important.”

When they weren’t sailing, Green’s husband was a machinist, and she was an administrative assistant at a bank in the personnel office - the precursor to modern human resources. The couple also had a son and a daughter who went on to provide them four grandchildren, seven great-grandchildren, and one great-great-grandchild.

Retired since 1986, Green was living in the home she bought with her husband in tiny Trappe, Maryland, when she suffered a fall that broke a number of bones in her back, necessitating a move closer to her son, who lived in Salisbury.

“I moved here sight unseen,” she says of Mallard Landing. “My son and his wife went and visited all the assisted living places, and they thought this one was the best, so I said OK. I moved in with no preconceived ideas about it.”

Green took to her new home like a mallard to water. She loves doing puzzles, reading, and debating commentary topics with other residents.

“I never even turn my TV on until the evening,” she says. We have so any fascinating people here. One man took pictures of the Panama Canal when it was being built, and another man visited a tiny island in the South Pacific where they use stones for money. There are really interesting people.”

Even better is her favorite visitor. One of her grandsons lives in the area, and brings his own son - Green’s great-grandson - to visit often.

“He loves to come here and go on walks,” she says with a smile. “The four apartment buildings are all connected by catwalks and he loves to come take that walk and go from building to building and take the elevator up and down. Having family close by is a wonderful thing.”